nirinia: (Default)
In more literary news, I am fascinated by the hypertex-like novel on Spotify, called 'Hurt'. Have a look at it in Spotify, Don't Let Go. From googling it, I see they call it an interactive audio novel. Which is not a bad name, I suppose. This just reinforces my feeling that literary theory is making a terrible mistake in not taking the internet into account.

Ian McEwan is in Norway in two weeks time, and Anette and I were devastated when we missed out on tickets to his reading at Litteraturhuset. But he's doing a reading/signing event at Tronsmo as well, so we'll get to see him after all. We're getting there at noon, armed to the teeth with coffee, books and sonnets so we can be productive while we wait. The Booker Longlist has been announced, I have not read any of them, but have heard of a good deal. There appears to be a lack of the usual outrage. 13 more books on the 'read!' list.

The Paris Review is always worth a quick read; poor Wilson writes wryly about discovering cynicism today. Have a look if only to pick out the allusions in the final paragraph – I love anyone who indulges in useless allusions, it means I can, too.
nirinia: (Default)
In more literary news, I am fascinated by the hypertex-like novel on Spotify, called 'Hurt'. Have a look at it in Spotify, Don't Let Go. From googling it, I see they call it an interactive audio novel. Which is not a bad name, I suppose. This just reinforces my feeling that literary theory is making a terrible mistake in not taking the internet into account.

Ian McEwan is in Norway in two weeks time, and Anette and I were devastated when we missed out on tickets to his reading at Litteraturhuset. But he's doing a reading/signing event at Tronsmo as well, so we'll get to see him after all. We're getting there at noon, armed to the teeth with coffee, books and sonnets so we can be productive while we wait. The Booker Longlist has been announced, I have not read any of them, but have heard of a good deal. There appears to be a lack of the usual outrage. 13 more books on the 'read!' list.

The Paris Review is always worth a quick read; poor Wilson writes wryly about discovering cynicism today. Have a look if only to pick out the allusions in the final paragraph – I love anyone who indulges in useless allusions, it means I can, too.
nirinia: (Default)
I suppose everyone is familiar with the situation at Gaza. I have previously refused to take a stand, and will continue my refusal. Though I suppose I'll be labeled Pro-Israel. Taking sides is unproductive. Particularly in this case. This, like all conflicts, is multifaceted. I will say that I do not support the way Israel is exercising power, and that I do not approve of their politics. Nor do I approve of Palestine or Hamaz's conduct.

Israel is doing themselves a disservice in continuing the offensive. They could by all accounts have gone in, taken out their targets and left it at that. But they did not, and I cannot begin to speculate why. This offensive is and the cost in civillian lives is horrid. But, when fighting an enemy that does not wear uniform, booby-traps houses, snipes and uses children as shields civilian casualties is inevitable. It should never have come to this.

How could Israel stay idle? They had to do something. As would we, had someone launched rockets at us. At our children, families and jobs. And this condemnation of it, talk of boycott, by the countries that created Israel is despicable. We have a responsibility to strive for peace in the state we created. A political solution. But with USA lacking a proper president that is difficult. It is the only country with the means to back a diplomatic solution.

Protests do nothing. Israel will not stop because, oh, god, no! There's a protest in Oslo. We can't lose the norwegian people's support. Protests are a democratic right, so I will not say they are pointless. I am sure they are a good way to show support. But violence solves nothing. And these violent youngsters are not innocent products of a bad system. They avoid the system at all costs, if they are anything like the ones we have encountered. If their parents care, they can do nothing. Most likely, they do not. These kids have been given every opportunity, for education and integration, but resist it. Their leaders are smart, much smarter than they would have people think. The goons really are as dumb as they sound, and follow the leaders unthinkingly. The only reason they partake in the protests is that it is a perfect opportunity to cause havoc. Cell phones and internet means easy organisation, thus they show up in numbers.

This war is very, very unfortunate. Not only because it takes a toll in human lives, but because it makes matters worse in Gaza. Israel's relationship with the rest of the world takes a turn for the worse, the conflict takes a leap in the wrong direction as parties grow ever more opposed to a treaty.
nirinia: (Default)
I suppose everyone is familiar with the situation at Gaza. I have previously refused to take a stand, and will continue my refusal. Though I suppose I'll be labeled Pro-Israel. Taking sides is unproductive. Particularly in this case. This, like all conflicts, is multifaceted. I will say that I do not support the way Israel is exercising power, and that I do not approve of their politics. Nor do I approve of Palestine or Hamaz's conduct.

Israel is doing themselves a disservice in continuing the offensive. They could by all accounts have gone in, taken out their targets and left it at that. But they did not, and I cannot begin to speculate why. This offensive is and the cost in civillian lives is horrid. But, when fighting an enemy that does not wear uniform, booby-traps houses, snipes and uses children as shields civilian casualties is inevitable. It should never have come to this.

How could Israel stay idle? They had to do something. As would we, had someone launched rockets at us. At our children, families and jobs. And this condemnation of it, talk of boycott, by the countries that created Israel is despicable. We have a responsibility to strive for peace in the state we created. A political solution. But with USA lacking a proper president that is difficult. It is the only country with the means to back a diplomatic solution.

Protests do nothing. Israel will not stop because, oh, god, no! There's a protest in Oslo. We can't lose the norwegian people's support. Protests are a democratic right, so I will not say they are pointless. I am sure they are a good way to show support. But violence solves nothing. And these violent youngsters are not innocent products of a bad system. They avoid the system at all costs, if they are anything like the ones we have encountered. If their parents care, they can do nothing. Most likely, they do not. These kids have been given every opportunity, for education and integration, but resist it. Their leaders are smart, much smarter than they would have people think. The goons really are as dumb as they sound, and follow the leaders unthinkingly. The only reason they partake in the protests is that it is a perfect opportunity to cause havoc. Cell phones and internet means easy organisation, thus they show up in numbers.

This war is very, very unfortunate. Not only because it takes a toll in human lives, but because it makes matters worse in Gaza. Israel's relationship with the rest of the world takes a turn for the worse, the conflict takes a leap in the wrong direction as parties grow ever more opposed to a treaty.

Max Manus

Dec. 17th, 2008 12:15 am
nirinia: (Default)
There's something of a debate going on in Norway at the moment, connected with the up-coming release of the film Max Manus. Featured in Aftenposten this weekend. He argues, very badly, that the resistance in Norway has been glorified. And that the heroes of the resistance have been hallowed undeservedly. The argument was poorly made on Fossens part, he should have been more coolly professional. The heroes dislike rocking of their pedestal, particularly when clumsily phrased.

Facts remain that the Norwegian military failed to whitstand the German occupation. The king and government fled, but kept working for the allied forces and Norway. The resistance could not do more than they did for fear of reprisals. What they did resulted in reprisals, and the strategic worth of it is debatable. Certainly, their presence must have boosted morales.

They operated in plain clothes, which by the geneva convention is illegal. Soldiers who fight out of uniform are criminals. By that convention, the occupation was in their right to punish those they got their hands on. Not by that saying that I agree. If we accept that what Milorg did was of worth beyond the symbolic, the fact remains that there are several soldiers deserving of being called heroes. If risking ones life in defence of democracy and freedom is the standard by which heroes are judged, Norwegian soldiers fighting for the Allied forces are heroes, as well. Several times the worthiness of the ones honoured in film and in museums. Several officers of low standing refused to return home, staying to fight for the allied forces under the British. A few of them were wounded, but stayed on. They've been forgotten, and have received low decorations if any. Compared to what the resistance did, these are true war heroes.

Had only Fossen written a decent article, he would had a chance at getting the point across. Now he comes off as vindictive and unprofessional, which I have no doubt he is. Sønstebø's answer is no better.

Max Manus

Dec. 17th, 2008 12:15 am
nirinia: (Default)
There's something of a debate going on in Norway at the moment, connected with the up-coming release of the film Max Manus. Featured in Aftenposten this weekend. He argues, very badly, that the resistance in Norway has been glorified. And that the heroes of the resistance have been hallowed undeservedly. The argument was poorly made on Fossens part, he should have been more coolly professional. The heroes dislike rocking of their pedestal, particularly when clumsily phrased.

Facts remain that the Norwegian military failed to whitstand the German occupation. The king and government fled, but kept working for the allied forces and Norway. The resistance could not do more than they did for fear of reprisals. What they did resulted in reprisals, and the strategic worth of it is debatable. Certainly, their presence must have boosted morales.

They operated in plain clothes, which by the geneva convention is illegal. Soldiers who fight out of uniform are criminals. By that convention, the occupation was in their right to punish those they got their hands on. Not by that saying that I agree. If we accept that what Milorg did was of worth beyond the symbolic, the fact remains that there are several soldiers deserving of being called heroes. If risking ones life in defence of democracy and freedom is the standard by which heroes are judged, Norwegian soldiers fighting for the Allied forces are heroes, as well. Several times the worthiness of the ones honoured in film and in museums. Several officers of low standing refused to return home, staying to fight for the allied forces under the British. A few of them were wounded, but stayed on. They've been forgotten, and have received low decorations if any. Compared to what the resistance did, these are true war heroes.

Had only Fossen written a decent article, he would had a chance at getting the point across. Now he comes off as vindictive and unprofessional, which I have no doubt he is. Sønstebø's answer is no better.

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